Path difference and phase relation relationship

Phase difference/ path difference - The Student Room

path difference and phase relation relationship

Learn basic and advanced concepts of Relation Between Path Difference And Phase Difference to clear IIT JEE Main, Advanced & BITSAT exam at Embibe. The relationship between period, frequency, and amplitude for a sine wave is illustrated in this image. Phase is the position of a point in time (an instant) on a waveform cycle. A complete cycle is Phase can also be an expression of relative displacement between two corresponding features (for example, peaks or zero. Relationships & health. Talk relationships By how much do the following change the phase difference? (i) 1 wavelength c) What path differences would give the following phase differences? it's a linear relationship.

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Point A is a point located on the first antinodal line. This specific antinode is formed as the result of the interference of a crest from Source 1 S1 meeting up with a crest from Source 2 S2.

The two wave crests are taking two different paths to the same location to constructively interfere to form the antinodal point. The crest traveling from Source 1 S1 travels a distance equivalent to 5 full waves; that is, point A is a distance of 5 wavelengths from Source 1 S1. The crest traveling from Source 2 S2 travels a distance equivalent to 6 full waves; point A is a distance of 6 wavelengths from Source 2 S2.

Interference, a question of path difference, or phase difference? - The Student Room

While the two wave crests are traveling a different distance from their sources, they meet at point A in such a way that a crest meets a crest. But will all points on the first antinodal line have a path difference equivalent to 1 wavelength? And if all points on the first antinodal line have a path difference of 1 wavelength, then will all points on the second antinodal line have a path difference of 2 wavelengths?

And what about the third antinodal line? And what about the nodal lines? These questions are investigated in the diagrams below through the analysis of the path difference for other points located on antinodal and nodal lines.

The Path Difference

Point B in the diagram below is also located on the first antinodal line. The point is formed as a wave crest travels a distance of 3 wavelengths from point S1 and meets with a second wave crest that travels a distance 4 wavelengths from S2.

The point is formed as a wave crest travels a distance of 4 wavelengths from point S1 and meets with a second wave crest that travels a distance 6 wavelengths from S2.

path difference and phase relation relationship

Point D is located on the first nodal line see the diagram below. A phase difference is analogous to two athletes running around a race track at the same speed and direction but starting at different positions on the track.

They pass a point at different instants in time. But the time difference phase difference between them is a constant - same for every pass since they are at the same speed and in the same direction. If they were at different speeds different frequenciesthe phase difference is undefined and would only reflect different starting positions.

Technically, phase difference between two entities at various frequencies is undefined and does not exist.

Phase (waves)

Time zones are also analogous to phase differences. A real-world example of a sonic phase difference occurs in the warble of a Native American flute.

phase difference and path difference

The amplitude of different harmonic components of same long-held note on the flute come into dominance at different points in the phase cycle. The phase difference between the different harmonics can be observed on a spectrogram of the sound of a warbling flute.

path difference and phase relation relationship

In time and frequency, the purpose of a phase comparison is generally to determine the frequency offset difference between wave cycles with respect to a reference. The oscilloscope will display two sine waves, as shown in the graphic to the right.

In the adjacent image, the top sine wave is the test frequencyand the bottom sine wave represents a signal from the reference. If the two frequencies were exactly the same, their phase relationship would not change and both would appear to be stationary on the oscilloscope display.

path difference and phase relation relationship